My Old Dead Relatives

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James NESMITH

James NESMITH[1, 2, 3]

Male 1718 - 1793  (74 years)

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  • Name James NESMITH 
    Born 4 Aug 1718  Bann Villa, Down, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    American Revolution
    Immigrant Flag
    Immigration
    Military Flag
    Military American Revolution - Col John Stark’s Reg; Battle of Bunker Hill: Pvt  [4
    Noteworthy Served at Battle of Bunker Hill. In Col John Stark’s regiment 
    Died 15 Jul 1793  Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10927  main
    Last Modified 2 Aug 2017 

    Father Deacon James NESMITH,   b. 1692, Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 May 1767, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth McKEEN,   b. 1696, Ballymoney, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Apr 1763, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Married 25 Dec 1714  Antrim, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F3707  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary DINSMOOR,   b. 20 Aug 1723, Ballymoney, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1805, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Children 
    +1. James NESMITH,   b. 10 Dec 1744, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Mar 1796, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
    +2. Margaret NESMITH,   b. 7 Feb 1747, Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jul 1823, Buxton [Standish], York, ME Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
    Last Modified 2 Aug 2017 
    Family ID F3705  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Jul 1793 - Londonderry, Rockingham, NH Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • James Nesmith, senior, of Londonderry, NH, was a private in Capt George Reid’s company, Col. John Stark’s regiment, as appears by a pay roll dated Aug 1, 1775. He enlisted May 4, 1775 and did active service at the battle of Bunker Hill.
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      Bunker Hill

      The Battles of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, signaled the start of the American Revolutionary War, and Stark returned to military service. On April 23, 1775, Stark accepted a Colonelcy in the New Hampshire Militia and was given command of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment and James Reed of the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment, also outside of Boston. As soon as Stark could muster his men, he ferried and marched them south to Boston to support the blockaded rebels there. He made his headquarters in the confiscated Isaac Royall House in Medford, Massachusetts.

      On June 16, the rebels, fearing a preemptive British attack on their positions in Cambridge and Roxbury, decided to take and hold Breed's Hill, a high point on the Charlestown peninsula near Boston. On the night of the 16th, American troops moved into position on the heights and began digging entrenchments.

      As dawn approached, lookouts on HMS Lively, a 20-gun sloop of war noticed the activity and the sloop opened fire on the rebels and the works in progress. This in turn drew the attention of the British admiral, who demanded to know what the Lively was shooting at. Subsequent to that, the entire British squadron opened fire. As dawn broke on June 17 the British could clearly see hastily constructed fortifications on Breed's Hill, and British Gen. Thomas Gage knew that he would have to drive the rebels out before fortifications were complete. He ordered Major General William Howe to prepare to land his troops. Thus began the Battle of Bunker Hill. American Col. William Prescott held the hill throughout the intense initial bombardment with only a few hundred American militia. Prescott knew that he was sorely outgunned and outnumbered. He sent a desperate request for reinforcements.

      Stark and Reed with the New Hampshire minutemen arrived at the scene soon after Prescott's request. The Lively had begun a rain of accurate artillery fire directed at Charlestown Neck, the narrow strip of land connecting Charlestown to the rebel positions. On the Charlestown side, several companies from other regiments were milling around in disarray, afraid to march into range of the artillery fire. Stark ordered the men to stand aside and calmly marched his men to Prescott's positions without taking any casualties.

      When the New Hampshire militia arrived, the grateful Colonel Prescott allowed Stark to deploy his men where he saw fit. Stark surveyed the ground and immediately saw that the British would probably try to flank the rebels by landing on the beach of the Mystic River, below and to the left of Breed's Hill. Stark led his men to the low ground between Mystic Beach and the hill and ordered them to "fortify" a two-rail fence by stuffing straw and grass between the rails. Stark also noticed an additional gap in the defense line and ordered Lieutenant Nathaniel Hutchins from his brother William's company and others to follow him down a 9-foot-high (2.7 m) bank to the edge of the Mystic River. They piled rocks across the 12-foot-wide (3.7 m) beach to form a crude defense line. After this fortification was hastily constructed, Stark deployed his men three-deep behind the wall. A large contingent of British with the Royal Welch Fusiliers in the lead advanced towards the fortifications. The Minutemen crouched and waited until the advancing British were almost on top of them, and then stood up and fired as one. They unleashed a fierce and unexpected volley directly into the faces of the fusiliers, killing 90 in the blink of an eye and breaking their advance. The fusiliers retreated in panic. A charge of British infantry was next, climbing over their dead comrades to test Stark's line—. This charge too was decimated by a withering fusillade by the Minutemen. A third charge was repulsed in a similar fashion, again with heavy losses to the British. The British officers wisely withdrew their men from that landing point and decided to land elsewhere, with the support of artillery.

      Later in the battle, as the rebels were forced from the hill, Stark directed the New Hampshire regiment's fire to provide cover for Colonel Prescott's retreating troops. The day's New Hampshire dead were later buried in the Salem Street Burying Ground, Medford, Massachusetts.

      While the British did eventually take the hill that day, their losses were formidable, especially among the officers. After the arrival of General George Washington two weeks after the battle, the siege reached a stalemate until March the next year, when cannon seized at the Capture of Fort Ticonderoga were positioned on Dorchester Heights in a deft night manoeuvre. This placement threatened the British fleet in Boston Harbor and forced General Howe to withdraw all his forces from the Boston garrison and sail for Halifax, Nova Scotia.

      After serving with distinction throughout the rest of the war, Stark retired to his farm in Derryfield. It has been said that of all the Revolutionary War generals, Stark was the only true Cincinnatus because he truly retired from public life at the end of the war. In 1809, a group of Bennington veterans gathered to commemorate the battle. General Stark, then aged 81, was not well enough to travel, but he sent a letter to his comrades, which closed "Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils." The motto Live Free or Die became the New Hampshire state motto in 1945. [5]

  • Sources 
    1. [S99] Ancestry.com.

    2. [S33] Family Search, LDS Family History Center.

    3. [S33] Family Search, LDS Family History Center, import 9 Jan 2016.

    4. [S24] Daughters of the American Revolution, A082406.

    5. [S76] Wikipedia.